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Articles

Here are a selection of articles
which may assist you with your
first aid knowledge.

"All training delivered under the auspices and in partnership with Allens Training Pty Ltd RTO 90909"

Welcome to North Brisbane First Aid Training!

Everybody needs to learn first aid. It may save your life one day, or someone you love.
Why not learn first aid today before it's too late. Call Rebecca Kerta on 0407 377 347. We service all areas of Brisbane.

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Doug, Windsor

"The training I completed today was fantastic the trainer was great!"

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Jack, Brendale
"Rebecca made the session fun and enjoyable whilst demonstrating the seriousness of responding to an emergency"

Recommended Articles

How to treat Sunburn

Unfortunately, there's no fast-fix sunburn treatment. Once you have sunburn, the damage is done — although it may take 12 to 24 hours after sun exposure to know the full extent and severity of sunburn, and several days or more for your skin to begin to heal.

 

In the meantime, the most effective sunburn treatment simply helps ease your discomfort:

 

  • Keep it cool. Apply cold compresses — such as a towel dampened with cool water — to the affected skin. Or take a cool bath.
  • Keep it moist. Apply aloe or moisturizing cream to the affected skin. Avoid products containing alcohol, which can further dry out skin. Beware of sunburn treatment products containing anesthetics, such as benzocaine. There's little evidence that these products are effective. In some cases, they may even irritate the skin. Benzocaine has been linked to a rare but serious, sometimes deadly, condition that decreases the amount of oxygen that the blood can carry. Don't use benzocaine in children younger than age 2 without supervision from a health care professional, as this age group has been the most affected. If you're an adult, never use more than the recommended dose of benzocaine and consider talking with your doctor.
  • Leave blisters intact. If blisters form, don't break them. You'll only slow the healing process and increase the risk of infection. If needed, lightly cover blisters with gauze.
  • Take an over-the-counter pain reliever. If needed, take anti-inflammatory medication — such as aspirin or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) — according to the label instructions until redness and soreness subside. Don't give children or teenagers aspirin. It may cause Reye's syndrome, a rare but potentially fatal disease.
  • Treat peeling skin gently. Within a few days, the affected area may begin to peel. This is simply your body's way of getting rid of the top layer of damaged skin. While your skin is peeling, continue to use moisturizing cream.

 

Consult a doctor for sunburn treatment if:

 

  • Severe sunburn covers a large portion of your body with blisters
  • Sunburn is accompanied by a high fever or severe pain
  • Severe sunburn doesn't begin to improve within a few days

To prevent future episodes of sunburn, use sunscreen frequently and liberally. Select a broad-spectrum product — one that provides protection against both ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation — with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15. If you take medications that make sunburn more likely, be especially careful. A common example is tetracycline taken orally for acne. Common sense counts, too. Cover up while you're outdoors, and stay in the shade as much as possible.

Read More

Read More

Treatment of Ticks at home

Everyone has a favorite way to remove ticks. Some are better than others. The greatest concern in removing a tick is the possible transmission of disease. Methods of removal that stimulate the tick to spit out even small amounts of their blood meal, or to pass infected saliva back into the host, may increase the likelihood of disease transmission.

Be Cautious

Commonly used methods such as a hot matchhead touched to the hind-parts of the tick, to covering or "painting" the tick with paint, nail polish, petroleum jelly, or gasoline may cause additional injury to the host (that's you or your pet) as well as stimulate the tick to spew out disease-causing germs.
You should be concerned about removing the head and mouthparts. Because the tick is attached firmly to most hosts, rough or improper handling may result in portions of the head and mouthparts remaining embedded in the skin. This can be a site of infection and inflammation and might increase the likelihood of transmitting disease.

How to remove a tick

Use a small pair of curved forceps or tweezers. If possible, wear some sort of hand protection such as gloves so you don't spread bacteria from the tick to your hands.

Using the tweezers, carefully flip the tick over onto its back. Grasp the tick firmly with the tweezers as close to the skin as possible. Apply gentle pulling until the tick comes free. Twisting or turning the tick does not make removal easier because the mouthparts are barbed, not spiraled.
Once removed, don't crush the tick because you may transmit disease. Rinse it down a sink or flush it down a toilet. Consider keeping it in a tightly closed jar or taped to a piece of paper. You may need to show the tick to the doctor if you become ill from the tick bite.
The area of the bite should leave a small crater or indentation where the head and mouthparts were embedded. If significant portions of the head or mouthparts remain, they may need to be removed by a doctor.
Thoroughly cleanse the bite area with soap and water or a mild disinfectant. Observe the area for several days for development of a reaction to the bite, such as a rash or signs of infection. Apply antibiotic cream to the area. Application of an antibiotic to the area may help prevent a local infection but does not affect the diseases transmitted by the tick.
Remember to wash your hands thoroughly after handling any tick or instruments that touched a tick. Clean and disinfect any instruments that were used.
Medical Treatment

The treatment of a given tick exposure will depend on the length of attachment, the type of tick, the diseases that are seen in the community, and your symptoms.

Local cleansing and antibiotic cream may be applied.
For itching, the doctor may recommend preparations containing diphenhydramine (Benadryl). You can apply these directly to the skin for itching, or you may take tablets by mouth.
Blood tests for Lyme disease may be done if there are symptoms. These tests are generally not recommended to screen people who do not have symptoms.
Oral antibiotics may be prescribed for some diseases. With more significant symptoms, you may need antibiotics given through an IV and may need to be hospitalized.
Other treatments may involve more detailed blood tests, fluids and medications given by IV, and admission to the hospital.

Read More

Popular Articles

How to treat Sunburn

Unfortunately, there's no fast-fix sunburn treatment. Once you have sunburn, the damage is done — although it may take 12 to 24 hours after sun exposure to know the full extent and severity of sunburn, and several days or more for your skin to begin to heal.

 

In the meantime, the most effective sunburn treatment simply helps ease your discomfort:

 

  • Keep it cool. Apply cold compresses — such as a towel dampened with cool water — to the affected skin. Or take a cool bath.
  • Keep it moist. Apply aloe or moisturizing cream to the affected skin. Avoid products containing alcohol, which can further dry out skin. Beware of sunburn treatment products containing anesthetics, such as benzocaine. There's little evidence that these products are effective. In some cases, they may even irritate the skin. Benzocaine has been linked to a rare but serious, sometimes deadly, condition that decreases the amount of oxygen that the blood can carry. Don't use benzocaine in children younger than age 2 without supervision from a health care professional, as this age group has been the most affected. If you're an adult, never use more than the recommended dose of benzocaine and consider talking with your doctor.
  • Leave blisters intact. If blisters form, don't break them. You'll only slow the healing process and increase the risk of infection. If needed, lightly cover blisters with gauze.
  • Take an over-the-counter pain reliever. If needed, take anti-inflammatory medication — such as aspirin or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) — according to the label instructions until redness and soreness subside. Don't give children or teenagers aspirin. It may cause Reye's syndrome, a rare but potentially fatal disease.
  • Treat peeling skin gently. Within a few days, the affected area may begin to peel. This is simply your body's way of getting rid of the top layer of damaged skin. While your skin is peeling, continue to use moisturizing cream.

 

Consult a doctor for sunburn treatment if:

 

  • Severe sunburn covers a large portion of your body with blisters
  • Sunburn is accompanied by a high fever or severe pain
  • Severe sunburn doesn't begin to improve within a few days

To prevent future episodes of sunburn, use sunscreen frequently and liberally. Select a broad-spectrum product — one that provides protection against both ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation — with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15. If you take medications that make sunburn more likely, be especially careful. A common example is tetracycline taken orally for acne. Common sense counts, too. Cover up while you're outdoors, and stay in the shade as much as possible.

Read More
Treatment of Ticks at home

Everyone has a favorite way to remove ticks. Some are better than others. The greatest concern in removing a tick is the possible transmission of disease. Methods of removal that stimulate the tick to spit out even small amounts of their blood meal, or to pass infected saliva back into the host, may increase the likelihood of disease transmission.

Be Cautious

Commonly used methods such as a hot matchhead touched to the hind-parts of the tick, to covering or "painting" the tick with paint, nail polish, petroleum jelly, or gasoline may cause additional injury to the host (that's you or your pet) as well as stimulate the tick to spew out disease-causing germs.
You should be concerned about removing the head and mouthparts. Because the tick is attached firmly to most hosts, rough or improper handling may result in portions of the head and mouthparts remaining embedded in the skin. This can be a site of infection and inflammation and might increase the likelihood of transmitting disease.

How to remove a tick

Use a small pair of curved forceps or tweezers. If possible, wear some sort of hand protection such as gloves so you don't spread bacteria from the tick to your hands.

Using the tweezers, carefully flip the tick over onto its back. Grasp the tick firmly with the tweezers as close to the skin as possible. Apply gentle pulling until the tick comes free. Twisting or turning the tick does not make removal easier because the mouthparts are barbed, not spiraled.
Once removed, don't crush the tick because you may transmit disease. Rinse it down a sink or flush it down a toilet. Consider keeping it in a tightly closed jar or taped to a piece of paper. You may need to show the tick to the doctor if you become ill from the tick bite.
The area of the bite should leave a small crater or indentation where the head and mouthparts were embedded. If significant portions of the head or mouthparts remain, they may need to be removed by a doctor.
Thoroughly cleanse the bite area with soap and water or a mild disinfectant. Observe the area for several days for development of a reaction to the bite, such as a rash or signs of infection. Apply antibiotic cream to the area. Application of an antibiotic to the area may help prevent a local infection but does not affect the diseases transmitted by the tick.
Remember to wash your hands thoroughly after handling any tick or instruments that touched a tick. Clean and disinfect any instruments that were used.
Medical Treatment

The treatment of a given tick exposure will depend on the length of attachment, the type of tick, the diseases that are seen in the community, and your symptoms.

Local cleansing and antibiotic cream may be applied.
For itching, the doctor may recommend preparations containing diphenhydramine (Benadryl). You can apply these directly to the skin for itching, or you may take tablets by mouth.
Blood tests for Lyme disease may be done if there are symptoms. These tests are generally not recommended to screen people who do not have symptoms.
Oral antibiotics may be prescribed for some diseases. With more significant symptoms, you may need antibiotics given through an IV and may need to be hospitalized.
Other treatments may involve more detailed blood tests, fluids and medications given by IV, and admission to the hospital.

Read More